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"In certain circles, Jeff Rosenstock is one of the most important figures in modern punk." – Pitchfork

It's New Year's Day. You're still coming out of the haze of 2017. Maybe your New Year's Eve got a little crazy, maybe it got a little dark. You're not sure if you're going to actually get out of bed before noon, but you roll over and check your phone, just in case anything terrible has happened while you were sleeping.

Wait.

What?

Call your best friend. There's a new Jeff Rosenstock record.

In certain circles, this is a pretty fucking sick way to start a new year. And for the rest of us, it's still quite a gift. Because there's this crazy, un-crushable thing about Jeff: He makes you want to believe in something again.

Jeff Rosenstock wrote POST- in a double-wide trailer in the Catskill Mountain town of East Durham, the snow-covered hills surrounding him like a landscape of blank pages. The serene, empty space was a big change of scenery for a guy who bounces around the world like a human comet, playing super-catchy, super-devastating shout-alongs to dedicated fans around the world—in Iowa, in Australia, in Mexico, in Sweden. In Croatia, an elderly woman approached him after the show and nervously told him in broken English that she was a big fan. She brought him a beachy sculpture. It's hanging in his bathroom. He'll totally send you a picture of it.

After playing with Bomb the Music Industry! for a decade, Jeff switched gears and produced records for The Smith Street Band, Dan Andriano, Mikey Erg and more, and started putting out records under his own name. After the release of WORRY., things started to get way more intense for Jeff and his band. They made their first TV appearance on Last Call with Carson Daly, USA Today called WORRY the #1 album of 2016, and the band took to the road, touring endlessly for the past two years, taking breaks only to record new music.

"2017 kinda felt like the year when we snuck in the back door," says Rosenstock, "We kept getting opportunities to do stuff - even though we take those opportunities to do stupid shit like say how much we made on stage." (This is the guy whose Pitchfork Music Festival performance last summer trended on Twitter after he took the stage and exclaimed, “Seventy-five hundred! Dollars! For us! To play! This festival!” Because, you know, he felt like he had to come clean about it.)

As if writing, recording, producing, and touring aren't enough, Jeff has also been tapped to compose all of the music for a brand new Cartoon Network program, Craig of the Creek, airing in 2018.

Written in the days after the 2017 Presidential inauguration, POST-'s lyrics get (really) heavy but the melodies are so catchy and the builds are so big and bright that the end result is more of a rallying cry than a surrender. The album was recorded in a one-week, 86-hour marathon recording session with Jack Shirley (Joyce Manor, Deafheaven) at the Atomic Garden in East Palo Alto, CA.

"The four of us stood in a room without headphones on and just played the songs live to tape, and after that we had some friends (Dan Potthast, Laura Stevenson, Chris Farren, PUP) fill out some of the sound."

So, if the record feels even more unifying than usual, like a party that turns into a sleepover that turns into egg-n-cheese sandwiches on the beach that turns into a protest march that unites a gang of buddies for eternity, well, maybe that's why.

Songs

  • 1
    Mornin'! (0:06)
  • 2
    USA (7:32)
  • 3
    Yr Throat (2:43)
  • 4
    All This Useless Energy (3:21)
  • 5
    Powerlessness (2:43)
  • 6
    TV Stars (4:21)
  • 7
    Melba (3:04)
  • 8
    Beating My Head Against A Wall (1:41)
  • 9
    9/10 (3:30)
  • 10
    Let Them Win (11:10)

Reviews

"POST- is a confirmation of Rosenstock as one of punk rock’s greatest, most effusive living songwriters."

Pitchfork

"And in using this straight-ahead, anachronistic bash-it-out music to reflect layered and complicated right-now fears and anxieties, Rosenstock pulls off some kind of magic trick. With no forewarning, Rosenstock gave POST- away to the world for free on New Year’s Day, as if he knew that we’d all need this little shot of catharsis."

Stereogum

"Rosenstock dropped his latest work, on the very first day of 2018, and as you pore through all nine — the first track is a five-second spoken word intro — of these defiant, angst-y, and wondrously hook-filled songs, the genius of the move becomes evident. Post- is a savage throat-clearing. A shaking off of the dogmas of a year that brought defeats, and misery, and bewilderment on a near-constant basis. 2017 was a bummer he allows. 2018 could be better if we try."

Uproxx

"As a collective package, POST- is incredibly accomplished. You’ll relate - hard - you’ll be shook, you’ll feel attacked, because this record underlines in red marker some uncomfortable truths which are articulated uproariously. POST- has set an extraordinarily high bar for the rest of punk in 2018 to clear."

The 405

"POST- is an album about finding hope in the future. Not in a passive, pacifying way, but by challenging yourself to step up and take action, day in and day out. While that sounds incredibly daunting—and like a really tiring listen—the album’s most impressive trait is that it makes all that vital work feel joyous and communal. In total, POST- calls on both its author and its listeners to improve, even if it doesn’t come easy."

AV Club

"Restless punk idol Jeff Rosenstock surprise-released his sixth studio album early on New Year’s Day. POST- is Rosenstock’s first since 2016’s brilliant WORRY, and it’ll shake your amorphous sense of New Year’s apathy right off."

Noisey

"He is an exuberant punk-rock supernova, grinning and roaring and not-so-quietly despairing. He is a rambunctious bard of late capitalism, perceptive as he is blunt, hooky as he is wordy. He is the architect of POST-, the first great record of 2018, released for free unexpectedly on New Year’s Day. He earns his lyrics’ exclamation points and the album’s all-caps title. He is, perhaps, your new favorite band. He is a guy named Jeff."

The Ringer

"Rosenstock’s specialties are cries of joy seemingly motivated by sheer terror — while anxiety about political unrest and tech-addled alienation pervade his lyrics, the music transforms those stress nightmares into rousing, unifying anthems that somehow manage to chase the demons away."

Uproxx

"The magnetic Jeff Rosenstock stays fully armed with his power-pop anthems, as full of indomitable hooks as they are of paralyzing doubt and cynicism."

Pitchfork

"...10 tracks of bruising pop, barely veiled rage, bloody fingernails and biting optimism that we didn’t even know existed four days ago. Jeff Rosenstock albums are always a wild ride. Turns out they’re a darn good way to start a new year, too."

Paste

"With POST-, Jeff Rosenstock has done a fine job of making cheerful music for unhappy times."

Exclaim!

"The record is near hypnotizing from the getgo, with the record opening up with the 7 and a half minute garage-state of the union address “USA”, having you sing along yet lose your mind in a fucked up ambient sleepwalk later on."

Sputnik

"It plays like a culmination of everything he’s mastered over the years: A woolly narration into the spoils of America and all its broken promises that picks up some friends from the basement to shout-along into the late night hours."

Recommended Listen

"POST- serves as a reason to stop being so mopey and bitter with ourselves and to channel that into something we can change the world with, no matter how much time that could take. We’ll never let them win, and maybe nothing will ever be the same, but as long as Jeff is as Jeff does, everything will be alright..."

Sputnik
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